FAQ

1. Who may sponsor a HIPPY program?

2. How many children need to be enrolled the first year and each subsequent year?

3. How many years can a home visitor stay with a HIPPY program?

4. Are programs ever adapted to the local environment?

5. Is there a need to role play each week? Is there a need to role play all the activities?

6. Do programs have to start with the Age 3 curriculum?

7. Do programs have to provide the Age 5 curriculum?

8. Are the storybooks ever collected back from the families and re-used with other children?

9. What roles can a volunteer organization play?

10. What does HIPPY cost?

Q1: Who may sponsor a HIPPY program?

A: HIPPY programs are operated by a variety of institutions and agencies including school districts, preschool programs, department of health, housing authorities, children welfare and other community-based organizations.

Q2: How many children need to be enrolled the first year and each subsequent year?

A: A model program enrolls 60 the first year and 60 additional children each year. By year three, a program will deliver all three ages (3-5) curriculums up to 180 children. The minimum allowable annual enrollment is 45 children. Studies have shown that smaller programs have less viability, per child cost is excessive and they are not as effective.

Q3: How many years can a home visitor stay with a HIPPY program?

A: It is strongly recommended that home visitors are employed no longer than three years. The model calls for a home visitor to enter the program with a child the same age as the cohort being served. New home visitors every three years helps ensure a fresh and energized perspective, eliminate staff “burn-out”, and fosters the economic development of the community.

Q4: Are programs ever adapted to the local environment?

A: The HIPPY model can be quite flexible in cases where adaptations are deemed necessary due to local conditions. However, there are core elements that are essential to effective programming that must be included.

Q5: Is there a need to role play each week? Is there a need to role play all the activities?

A: Yes. Role play has a dual purpose. It is the method of instruction, but it is also the only way to really check for full comprehension. It is essential to make sure that the home visitors fully comprehend the lessons before they work with the parents; and it is essential to confirm that the parents fully understand how to make the lesson meaningful for their child. The only way to be sure of these aspects is by completely role playing all the activities in the weekly packet.

Q6: Do programs have to start with the Age 3 curriculum?

A: It is recommended that programs implement Age 3, although it is possible to start with the Age 4 curriculum. Beginning implementation with Age 3 is desirable for several reasons, including the importance of a rich educational environment for children as early as possible; a greater length of time to prepare children for success in school and in life; the younger the age of the child, the easier it is to engage parents in educational activities involving their child; and the increased potential for developing good habits (both children and parents).

Q7: Do programs have to provide the Age 5 curriculum?

A: Programs are required to offer the Age 5 curriculum to all parents. Participation in the Age 5 curriculum subtly suggests and guides parents to the conclusion that they are, and still should be, actively involved in their children’s education. Enrollment in the Age 5 curriculum increases the likelihood of greater and longer-term gains for the children. Children must have completed Age 4 in order to receive the Age 5 curriculum.

Q8: Are the storybooks ever collected back from the families and re-used with other children?

A: No. The storybooks become the property of the children. The parents are requested to read and re-read the books to the HIPPY child as many times as the child desires. For some families, HIPPY introduces literacy into the home. In the event a family drops out before the end of the school year, the storybooks already distributed may be that child’s only path to reading for pleasure.

Q9: What roles can a volunteer organization play?

A: Volunteer organizations, such as the National Council of Jewish Women, Junior League and Kiwanis, support HIPPY programs in a variety of ways, depending on local needs and interests. Volunteers often become involved with HIPPY during the initial stages of implementation, frequently serving as catalysts. In existing programs, volunteers often assist with field trips, groups meetings and graduation ceremonies. Volunteers can also help make invaluable program connections: they serve on advisory committees and assist with advocacy, fund raising and public relations.

Q10: What does HIPPY cost?

A: Costs to the community agency are approximately $3,000 per child, per year. HIPPY is free to the parents who participate.

604-676-8250

508-1190 Melville Street Vancouver, BC. Canada

info@hippycanada.ca